Historical Timeline

Department Heads

  • John F. Miller 1924 – 1951
  • Paul H. Derr 1951 – 1969
  • Dr. Frederick R. Drews 1969 – 1981
  • Dr. Richard A. Lauffer 1981 – 1989
  • Dr. Angela Lumpkin 1989 – 1994
  • Dr. Judy C. Peel 1996 – 1999
  • Dr. March Krotee 2001 – 2007
  • Dr. Thomas Roberts 2007 – 2014
  • Dr. Tommy Holden 2014 – present

Interim Department Heads

  • Dr. William Toole
  • William H. Sonner
  • Lynn Berle
  • Dr. Charles Patch

Dates

Events

1923 – 1936

In 1923 the Department of Physical Education and Athletics was established under the authorization of the Board of Trustees. Athletics was included in the Department of Physical Education, thus all coaches were teaching faculty.

John F. Miller was named department head from 1923-51.

1924 A two-year physical education requirement (PE 101 & 102) was implemented for graduation and taken during their freshmen & sophomore years. Also, all freshmen had to take a special one-day hygiene class before receiving credit for their physical education class. PE 120 (an array of classes to choose from) was an elective for juniors and seniors.
1925

Thompson Gymnasium was opened. Construction cost was $410,000.

Thompson_Gymnasium_1925

Thompson Gymnasium – 1925

Thompson Gymnasium Indoor Activity Area

Thompson Gymnasium Outdoor Activity Area

Thompson Gymnasium Outdoor Activity Area

1933 A major in physical education was approved to prepare students to teach and coach in public schools. There was only one graduating class in 1937 because of the depression, which resulted in a consolidation of programs within the university system [NC State College, UNC-Chapel Hill and Women’s College, currently UNC- Greensboro].
1937 The Department of Physical Education and Athletics name was changed to Department of Physical Education and the Department of Athletics.
1946 Physical Education and Athletics became separate departments.
1951 Paul H. Derr was named department head from 1951-1969.
1954 The University moved from a quarter system to a semester system, which resulted in the four semester physical education requirement.
1958 The increasing student enrollment and lack of space in Thompson Hall required an adjustment in the formatting of classes. Physical Education classes were adjusted to two 8-week classes within a semester. The numeric grades from the two classes were averaged for a final letter grade.
1960

Physical Education Faculty 1960

Physical Education Faculty - 1960

Physical Education Faculty – 1960

1961

The department established the Adult Fitness Program. It was the first extension program in the adult fitness area for middle aged men over 35 researching cardiovascular fitness. This program continues to serve the community.

Carmichael Gymnasium was opened. Construction cost was $2.7 million.

Carmichael Gymnasium

Carmichael Gymnasium

1962 As the female enrollment increased, the physical education department provided women’s only classes
1969 Dr. Frederick R. Drews was named department head from 1969 – 1981.
1970 The first exercise physiologist, Dr. William P. Marley, was hired to develop a Health & Physical Fitness Course and train the staff to
teach it (1970-1975).
1971 This Health & Physical Fitness course was implemented and named PE 100. A battery of tests was administered to each student so that they could be classified on one of four fitness level categories for class participation. PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness is the foundation course in the four-semester requirement for graduation.
1980 All classes became co-educational.
1981 Dr. Richard A. Lauffer was named department head from 1981 – 1989.
1987
The 8-week classes were changed to a semester format.
The addition to Carmichael Gymnasium allowed for an expansion in course offerings particularly in the areas of outdoor education and dance. Construction cost was $10 million.
1989
Dr. Angela Lumpkin was named department head from 1989 – 1994.
The first minor developed was in Coaching Education.
1993
First Distance Education course offered by the department was Aerobics and Body Conditioning, Spring 1993 by Peggy S. Domingue.
1996
Dr. Judy C. Peel was named department head from 1996 – 1999. PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness morphed into courses with similar content but different modes of exercising (i.e., PE 101 Fitness and Wellness, PE 102 Fitness Walking, PE 103 Water Aerobics, PE 104 Swim Conditioning, PE 105 Aerobics and body conditioning, PE 106 Triathlon, PE 107 Run Conditioning, etc.).
1997
The Department of Physical Education graduation requirement (GEP) was changed to a two-semester requirement with a minimum requirement of one hour from one of the 100-level courses.
The Department of Physical Education relocated to the Division of Student Affairs.
1998
The Outdoor Leadership minors began offering classes.
1999
The Fitness Leader minor began offering classes.
2001
Dr. March Krotee was named department head from 2001-2007.
2002
The Department of Physical Education was separated into three departments:
Physical Education
Campus Recreation
Carmichael Complex & Facilities Operations
2005
The Health Minor began offerings classes.
2006
The Fitness Leader Minor was re-named Fitness Leadership Minor.
2007
Dr. Thomas Roberts was named department head from 2007 – present.
Carmichael Recreation Center was opened. Construction cost was $12 million.
Carmichael Recreation Center

Carmichael Recreation Center

2009
The university updated the GEP title to “Physical Education / Healthy Living”.
2010
The Fitness Leadership minor name was changed to Sports Science Minor. Campus Recreation changed name to University Recreation. Carmichael Complex & Facilities Operations merged with University Recreation.
2011
The Emergency Medicine Program was initiated by Physical Education and Biology. The first class was offered (PEH/BIO 300; EMT-Basic).
2012
Department of Physical Education changed name to Health and Exercise Studies (HES).
2013
Course prefixes of PE, PEC, PEH, PEO, and PES changed to nine HES prefixes [HESA (aquatics), HESD (dance), HESE (emergency med), HESF (fitness), HESO (outdoor), HESM (minors), HESR (racquet), HESS (specialty), HEST (team)].
HES reaches 30 course offerings in the Delta Distance Education Program, the most diverse offering of any department at NC State.